Spain Time Is My Time

16 08 2011

Time goes by differently in the country of Spain. Sure, they are in a different time zone (six hours ahead of the good ol’ U.S. of A.) but it’s more than just a time zone that will make you feel discombobulated during a typical day in Spain, if you’re not used to one. Spaniards do what they want, and it’s because of this, that they operate on a different time schedule than say, your ordinary American.

You may have heard of a siesta. Basically this means that Spaniards like to take a good, long nap smack dab in the middle of the day. In Spain (and some other countries like Italy and Greece) lunch is the largest meal of the day. Shops close, families congregate in the home, and a few hours are taken out of mid-day. During this time, people resort to napping after a large meal to escape the hot noon sun commonly found in Mediterranean countries.

However, this nap doesn’t signify the end of a day. Come the afternoon around 2-3PM, everyone goes back to their jobs and works late into the evening. Because of the siesta break in the day, people are more energized in the evening to continue working. Another effect of the mid-day break is the wild and very late nightlife that is typical in Spain. Dinner is eaten fairly late, beginning around 9:30PM. Spaniards are known to stay out late often, sometimes until 5 or 6AM. Following up, mornings don’t typically begin until 10AM. As you can see, Spaniards pretty much act like your typical American college student.

Talk about my kind of lifestyle. I basically run on Spain-time. Even before I traveled abroad, I had begun to eat very late dinners often starting after 8PM. I still haven’t fully transitioned from my crazy college sleep schedule either, and given the freedom, I’m sure I could easily operate on a similar schedule to those who live in Spain. If I moved to Spain, I would have no problem with adjusting to their time. America needs to get on the siesta bandwagon!

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