Happy Haggis Day

25 01 2011

(Though frogs are not actually relative to this post, the song is supposedly Scottish, and it’s amazing, so it has been deemed appropriate for today’s post.)

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Well, I successfully finished a whole week of eating vegan, something I never dreamt I would be able to achieve. It was more difficult and restricting than eating as a vegetarian, which I have become slightly accustomed to, as I round out this month of a meat-less diet. One of my all time favorite foods however, is a meat-lovers dream, and is also the celebratory food for today’s holiday in Scotland.

For those of you who have the misfortune of being unfamiliar with what haggis is, check out this recipe of one of my favorite foods. Haggis is the national dish of Scotland and is known to many as a delicacy. The ingredients may throw you off, but it truly is delicious. Today, for all Scotts, is Robert Burns Day. Robert Burns was a famous Scottish poet, who is well known for his (hard to pronounce, as it’s in Gaelic) Address To A Haggis. Below are just a few verses of this glorious ode:

Fair fa’ your honest, sonsie face,
Great chieftain o’ the puddin-race!
Aboon them a’ ye tak your place,
Painch, tripe, or thairm:
Weel are ye wordy of a grace
As lang’s my arm. 

The groaning trencher there ye fill,
Your hurdies like a distant hill,
Your pin wad help to mend a mill
In time o’ need,
While thro’ your pores the dews distil
Like amber bead.

His knife see rustic Labour dight,
An’ cut ye up wi’ ready slight,
Trenching your gushing entrails bright
Like onie ditch;
And then, O what a glorious sight,
Warm-reekin, rich!

As you can see, it’s kind of impossible to make sense of this Address. Thankfully, this website has a pretty good translation. I think it’s pretty great that Robert Burns wrote a poem about such a fabulous dish. Perhaps Robert Burns was a foodie. Or maybe he sought to show that haggis is representative of something more; of a Scottish nationalistic spirit; of hard work and determination.

Haggis. Yum.

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