D.C.’s Own Food Part 3

29 07 2009

More research has been done on the front of finding D.C.’s own food and I may have found it. While surfing the web today, I came across this article about what the city’s own alcoholic beverage is. Apparently according to the article, the drink is called “the rickey, a libation that bubbles with such strong capital ties that it’s legitimately called D.C.’s native cocktail.” Wow. Who knew? The Rickey is served in a tall glass and consists of gin or bourbon, lime and seltzer. Sounds pretty basic to me.

Anyways, I don’t care so much for what drink belongs to the city, but once again, the Half-smoke has been associated with D.C. The article says that the Rickey is “as Washingtonian as half-smokes and humidity.”

My next step was to double check the Half-smoke’s status on Wikipedia (because that makes something, legit, right?). There I found this juicy part of its definition:

“A half-smoke is a type of sausage found in the United States capital of Washington, D.C., and the surrounding region.”

The History section of the page also claims the D.C. origins:

“The “original” half smoke is considered to be the sausage distributed by D.C.’s Briggs and Co. meatpackers, originating in around 1950, though Raymond Briggs started selling his half-smokes circa 1930.”

I guess if Wikipedia says it’s true, then it must be so.  Now all I have to do is actually try one of these bad boys. (Yeah, I know, I haven’t tried a Half-smoke. I’m a native Washingtonian. It’s wrong. So is this. -But more on that to come.)

Advertisements

Actions

Information

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




%d bloggers like this: